Scientific Program

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Day 1 :

  • Track 4: Biotechnology and Genetics in Aquaculture

Session Introduction

Gen Hua Yue

Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, 117604 Singapore.

Title: ASIAN SEABASS THE NEXT BIG FISH-STATUS OF ITS BREEDING PROGRAM
Speaker
Biography:

Gen Hua Yue is a Director (of Strategic Research Programs) and Senior Principal Investigator at the Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, Singapore. He is an adjunct professor at several universities in China and Singapore. He got his PhD at the University Hohenheim, Germany in 1999. The research focus of his group is to use genomic approaches to improve the productivity and sustainability of economically important fish (e.g. Asian seabass and marine tilapia). He has published over 130 scientific papers in peer-reviewed international journals. He has been on the editorial boards of several international journals (e.g. Scientific Reports, BMC Genomics, Aquaculture, Aquaculture and Fisheries, Gene, Frontiers in Livestock Genomics, Plos One) and has evaluated over 200 scientific papers for 58 international journals. He has reviewed research proposals from the EU, USA, China, Ireand, Kuwait, New Zealand and Singapore since 2007.

 

Abstract:

The Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) is an important marine foodfish and has been cultured for food in Southeast Asia since the 1980s. The aquaculture industry of this fish is growing at a rapid rate. In Singapore, with the strong support from Singapore government, we started a breeding program for Asian seabass to improve its growth performance, disease resistance and meat quality in 2004. We have developed a large number of genomic resources to facilitate the breeding program, such as whole genome sequence, DNA markers, a molecular parentage system, linkage maps, BAC libraries, transcriptomes, and a genotyping by sequencing platform based on NEXTseq 500. After three generations of family-based selection in mass crosses with molecular parentage analysis, we have increased the growth of Asian seabass by over 70% as compared to the control. Using progeny test and GWAS, we have identified brooders resistant to the big belly disease, nodavirus and iridovirus and established one line of Asian seabass resistant to these diseases. Using QTL mapping and GWAS, we identified DNA markers associated with growth and meat quality traits. We established one line for quick growth and another line for high content of omega-3s in flesh. Hybrids generated by crossing between the three lines are being tested in farms in Singapore and other countries. The growth and disease-resistance performance, as well as the content of omega-3 are very promising. In this presentation. I will summarize our traditional and molecular breeding program, and the achievements of this breeding program, as well as the future directions of research.

Biography:

Abstract:

In recent years, there has been a growing interest in controlling disease problems through alternative methods since the use of chemotherapeutic agents may lead to occurrence of resistant bacteria. In this study, a  total  of twenty fresh and  dry catfish samples respectively were purchased at three  different markets in Ibadan metropolis and  were analyzed for enumeration of lactic acid bacteria. The lactic acid bacteria isolates were subjected to various  morphological and biochemical tests. Antagonistic activity and antibiotics susceptibility of the isolates was carried out using agar diffusion method. Our results indicate that only 13 isolates out of 55 isolates obtained were heterofermenters, 15 out of the isolates had antagonistic activity against Salmonella typhi ATCC  33458 and Escherichia coli  ATCC 35218. Salmonella typhi was more inhibited by the LAB isolates. Only 8 out the LAB isolates were inhibited by the antibiotics of which Ofloxacin had the highest zone of inhibition . The lactic acid bacteria isolated in this study as ldentified  by API CHL 50 kit include Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus acidophilus andLactobacillus pentosus. This study revealed that the lactic acid bacteria from catfish can inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria and could be used in aquaculture  to control pathogenic organisms.

 

  • Track 2: Aquatic Resources and Environmental Management

Session Introduction

Sandhya Sukumaran

ICAR-Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Ernakulam North P.O., Kochi, Kerala - 682018

Title: Panmixia and stable population history in the small pelagic fish, Stolephorus indicus (Indian anchovy) from Indian peninsular waters
Biography:

Sandhya Sukumaran has her expertise in conservation genetics, genotoxicology, molecular ecology and biodiversity. She worked on reef corals of Gulf of Mannar and Palk Bay to understand their ecology, taxonomy and diversity.  The effect of genotoxic chemicals on aquatic ecosystem and the role of sex in shaping evolutionary adaptations were studied using matrix population modeling in Artemia.  Presently her research is focused on population and conservation genetics of fishes and its relation to climatic fluctuations in the Indian Ocean.

Abstract:

Conservation of intra-specific biodiversity and bio-complexity of marine fishes is very pertinent as this gives resilience to climatic and environmental fluctuations. Anchovies are small pelagic fishes which occupy a key position in the trophic food web of the ocean. They are sensitive to environmental and climatic fluctuations as they respond with population abundances and crashes. In view of their importance, it is essential to understand the intra-specific diversity and genetic stock structure patterns as diversity is the key to sustainability. Hence, a study was carried out to understand genetic stock structure and historic demography of Indian anchovy, Stolephorus indicus from Indian peninsular waters using mitochondrial DNA markers, mitochondrial ATPase and COI sequences. Indian anchovy, Stolephorus indicus was collected from its range of distribution along Indian peninsular waters; Vizag, Tuticorin, Cochin, Goa and Andamans. Mitochondrial ATPase and COI gene regions were amplified and analysed in 90 and 105 individuals respectively. High haplotype diversity was associated with low nucleotide diversity in both sets of sequences. There were 44 haplotypes out of 90 individuals with a haplotype diversity value of 0.82 and nucleotide diversity value of 0.002 when ATPase sequences were analyzed. The sequences of Cytochrome C oxidase revealed 52 haplotypes out of 105 individuals with a haplotype diversity value of 0.651 and nucleotide diversity value of 0.002. Overall genetic differentiation (Fst) was low and insignificant between populations indicating panmixia. Historic demographic analyses showed signals of stable population size. Larvae of S. indicus is pelagic and widespread dispersal of larvae due to ocean currents may be contributing to substantial mixing and consequent homogeneity of stocks across Indian peninsular waters. 

Biography:

Abstract:

The position of fish hatcheries in an extreme arid area may indicate that they acquire specific environmental conditions. The purpose of this work is to describe the main features of the fish ponds phytoplankton population in relation to their ecological status. Attention is paid to phytoplankton quantity and quality as well as to changes in phytoplankton assemblages caused by alterations of environmental features. Investigations of the hydrobiological conditions of aquaculture's phytoplankton that were carried out during the last two decades in aquacultures of the Nile tilapia; Oreochromis niloticus (L., 1758) and the grass carp; Ctenophryngodon idella (Val., 1844) were followed as a case study. The phytoplankton population dynamics are expected as a consequence of the impact of combination of different biotic and abiotic elements. The phytoplankton development may reflect the ecological status of fishponds. Due to occasional man-made manuring, irregular variations in the availability of macronutrients could influence the qualitative and quantitative composition of the phytoplankton community. The feasibility of phytoplankton monitoring as an indicator of ecological status of fish ponds, identification problems of phytoplankton and the need of a methodological tradition are considered. These investigations provide evidence on complex trajectories of aquatic ecosystem shifts driven by hydrobiological alterations in aquacultures of subtropical habitats.

Vaitheeswaran Thiruvengadam

Department of Fisheries Biology and Resource Management, Fisheries College and Research Institute,Tamil Nadu Fisheries University, Thoothukudi - 628 008.

Title: A RECORD OF BROWN PAPER NAUTILUS ARGONAUTA HIANS LIGHTFOOT, 1786 (FAMILY: ARGONAUTIDAE) (LAMARCK, 1809) OFF THOOTHUKUDI COAST OF GULF OF MANNAR FROM INDIA
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The brown paper nautilus, Argonauta hians Lightfoot, 1786 was
recorded for the first time from Indian waters while investigating the
biodiversity of the molluscs of Gulf of Mannar during June, 2011. One specimen
of the said species was collected as an incidental by-catch in the trawl catch
off Thoothukudi coast of Gulf of Mannar, from India, between 08º 35’ 22.5" N
78º 27’ 40.9" E and 08º 31’ 91.2"N 78º 25’ 32.7"E at a depth of 305-310 m.

  • Track 11:Culture of Fishes, Crustaceans, Molluscs and Aquatic Plants
Biography:

École Nationale Supérieure des Sciences de la Mer et de l’Aménagement du Littoral,Campus Universitaire de Dely IbrahimBoisdesCars(ENSSMAL),Dely Ibrahim 16320, Algiers, Algeria

Abstract:

Sustainable oyster production of Crassostrea gigas in Algeria requires information about growing, condition and reproduction. This study documents growth rates, condition index (CI), and describes the reproductive cycle of oysters cultivated in open sea using plastic sacs suspended from long-lines. One experiment refers to growth and condition of juveniles (May 2011–February 2012), and a second experiment with adults (October 2012–October 2013), provides length and weight variation, CI and describes gametogenesis using oocyte cohort analysis. Juveniles showed exponential growth patterns of mean shell length (0.137 mm day–1) and total weight gain (0.141 g day–1). CI of juveniles was low during the cultivation period. Length and weight of adult oysters ranged from 93.9–109.1 mm and 64.1–132.3 g respectively, while CI was satisfactory (>50) most of the time. The reproductive cycle of C. gigas begins in December, with several oocytes cohorts growing during January-February, maturing in March-May and showing a main spawning in June when temperature was increasing. Spawning of less intensity were observed during July-October after the peak of temperature. Spring phytoplankton blooms seem to provide energy for gonad development. These results may serve as baseline data for the development of aquaculture programs in Algeria.

Kiuomars Rohani-Ghadikolaei

Persian Gulf and Oman Sea Ecological Research Institute, Iranian Fisheries Research Science Organization, Agricultural Research, Education & Extension Organization, Tehran, Iran

Title: Evaluation of Pacific white Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931) culturing management in Teyab farms, Hormozgan, Iran
Biography:

Kiuomars Rohani-Ghadikolaei has completed his PhD at the age of 42 years from University Science Malaysia
(USM), Malaysia. He is the head of Aquaculture Department of Persian Gulf and Oman Sea Ecological
Research Institute affiliated to Iranian Fisheries Research Sciences Organization. He has published more than
4 papers in reputed journals and presented more than 6 papers in International Conferences; as well as has been
serving as an editorial board member of Iranian Fisheries Research Journals.

Abstract:

Due to outbreak of white spot disease (WSD), in 2004, that caused mass mortality of the indigenous species Penaeus indicus in southern shrimp farms of Iran,Litopenaeus vannamei has introduced to Iranian shrimp culture industry, and now is farmed in southern and northern coastal parts of Iran on a commercial scale. Considering shrimp farming is as a new and improving aquaculture practice in Iran, it faces some challenging problems in term of culturing management that need to be monitored.The present study purposed to assess the performance of shrimp farming management in 3 randomly selected farms in Teyab, Hormozgan, Iran. The results showed that, although the greatest diversity in the Teyab farms were related to diatoms, but cyanophytes showed higher density than the diatoms (figure 1). The results indicated that during the culturing period, mean values for temperature, salinity, pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) were not significantly different in farms, whereas the levels for Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and total organic matter (TOM) showed the highest content onwards to the end of culturing period (Table 1). The average total length or final weigh showed no significant differences in 3 farms at the end of culturing period. Positive correlation was found between pH and water temperature, pH and DO, pH and ammonia; Chl-a and DO; growth parameters and DO, growth parameters and Chl-a. However a negative correlation was observed between TOM and pH, TOM and water temperature, TOM and ammonia, TOM and pH; Chl-a and water temperature, Chl-a and salinity, Chl-a and transparency; growth parameters and salinity, growth parameters and pH, growth parameters and ammonia. However, water quality parameters should be monitored to serve as guide for managing a pond so that conditions that can adversely affect the growth of shrimp can be avoided.

Figure 1: Phytoplankton Density (a), Species Diversity (b), in shrimp farms

Table 1: Correlation between physiochemical parameters in shrimp farms

Biography:

Mohammad Gorgij Jaski has completed his MSc. on aquaculture at the age of 28 years from Islamic Azad University, Iran and now he is PhD student in Aquaculture nutrition. He is the head of Shrimp hatchery production named, Sontderaf in Jask, Iran. He has published more than 2 papers in reputed journals and presented more than 3 papers in International Conferences.

Abstract:

The major nutritional interest in Spirulina is due to its high protein content, ease of digestion and a significant content of vitamins, minerals, amino acids and high value pigments, which have applications in health foods, feed and therapeutics industries. In order to provide optimum growth and protein content, S. platensis cells were grown in modified Zarrouk (1966) media culture at different salinity (30, 32 and 35ppt), temperature (20, 23, 26 and 28ºC) and intensity (50, 75 and 90 μmol m-2s-1). The results of the present study clearly showed that the highest alga biomass and growth rate was obtained following culture under the 32 ppt salinity, 26°C temperature, and under a 13h light:11h dark photoperiod regime at a light intensity of 90 μmol m-2s-1 provided by cool white fluorescent tubes (figure 1). Maximum alga biomass and growth rate of S.platensis in a 5 liter Erlenmeyer flask for twelve days reached to 8 gr L−1 and 0.28 day-1, respectively. However, the mean alga biomass of S.platensisin temperature regimes 20, 23, 26 and 28ºC (under salinity of 32 ppt, and 75 μmol m-2s-1 irradiance) were 4.72, 5.15, 7.69 and 7.03 gr L−1, respectively. The results clearly showed that S. platensis successfully cultivated under different physical condition and maximum protein content was produced in the 30 ppt salinity, 28°C temperature, and 75 μmol m-2s-1 irradiance. A two-way ANOVA indicated significant effects of temperature on the growth rate of S. platensis followed by salinity, and then the interaction between temperature and salinity (p<0.05). Based
on the results from the present study, providing suitable media culture and physical condition can be considered as a promising method to S. platensis cultivation for achieving optimal biomass and protein production.

Figure 1: Alga biomass following culture under the 32 ppt salinity

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